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LIKE A QUEEN – Boucheron’s new High Jewellery collection


Princess Elizabeth turned eighteen in 1944, she received a Boucheron aquamarine and diamond double clip brooch. She would continue to wear this sentimental design throughout her reign. In 2020, Claire Choisne, Creative Director of Boucheron, decided to take inspiration from this unique piece to create a High Jewelry collection reinterpreting the famous Art Deco design through eighteen contemporary new designs.

“Histoire de Style, Like a Queen draws inspiration from an icon whose style transcended decades.”

A SENTIMENTAL PIECE

“Three years ago, when I started looking for inspirations for this collection in the Boucheron archives, I couldn’t get my mind off that Art Deco double clip brooch, explains Claire Choisne. The severity and geometry of the Art Deco design, tempered by the softness and light blue hue of the aquamarines, always fascinated me. I was also touched by the sentimental value of this double clip, which Queen Elizabeth II wore at pivotal moments in her reign.”


This piece of jewelry joined the British Royal Family on July 31, 1937, through Prince George, Duke of Kent, who purchased it from the Boucheron boutique in London.


Seven years later, the family gave it to Princess Elizabeth for her eighteenth birthday. Throughout her reign, Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, wore it on a number of occasions, most notably including her Diamond Jubilee on June 5, 2012; on May 8, 2020, for the 75th anniversary of the speech by George VI announcing the end of World War II; and on the 70th anniversary of her coronation on February 6, 2022.

AN EXERCISE IN CREATIVITY

Inspired by Queen Elizabeth’s distinctive style, formidable character and effervescent presence, Claire Choisne thought it most fitting to work with this particular design and to bring it up-to-date in a collection that surpasses all genres. “Being able to wear a piece in a number of ways, as well as the use of color, were central to our work on this collection, so that both men and women may wear these pieces. We wanted these eighteen variations to reflect the ease with which the original was worn, since the two clips may be attached in various ways, on their own or together. We also wanted this collection to convey the elegance distinctive of this Art Deco piece.”


Thus, each piece of this Histoire de Style line reflects the unique spirit of the two cerulean clips. “On certain jewelry sets, we broke down the original geometry of the design. On others, we took the opposite approach: we compacted the Art Deco design. And elsewhere, we brought in another dimension by playing on the colors of the gemstones.”


A cherry ruby necklace, a pink tourmaline brooch, an azure aquamarine cuff bracelet, earrings adorned with lush emeralds... Histoire de Style, Like a Queen stands out with its monochrome plays on joyful, intense colors, inspired by the spirit of the bright outfits that Queen Elizabeth famously wore.

Like a story told through eighteen chapters, Histoire de Style, Like a Queen transcends its initial objective – to construct a full High Jewelry collection inspired by a single piece – and offers a glimpse of the true genius behind its design.


Hypnotic Blue

The deep, hypnotic blue of a six-carat Ceylon sapphire – clasped within a double arc set with round and baguette diamonds – captures the eye and adorns an entire phalange.


This piece coordinates with a hyperbolic cuff bracelet in lacquered gold set with cabochon- and baguette-cut diamonds and aquamarines. Although the design of this piece almost identically reflects that of the 1937 double clip brooch, the use of blue lacquer to emphasize the stones provides it with a very up-to-date look.

Frosty White

In the great tradition of wearing High Jewelry in various ways, the Frosty White necklace in white gold, diamonds and rock crystal offers six different configurations. The piece is set with more than a thousand diamonds, and its sides are adorned with the two famous Art Deco designs which may be detached and worn as a single or double brooch. The draped lower portion of the necklace, composed of four radiant strands, is also independent. It may metamorphose into a jacket adornment or cape clasp.


This piece is completed by a pair of ear pendants in diamonds and rock crystal that are also transformable.


In keeping with this spirit, Boucheron has created a shape-shifting ring in diamonds and rock crystal. Adorning three fingers, this model is set with an emerald-cut central diamond (DFL II A) of 3.08 carats that may also be worn as a solitaire.


Green Garden

When considered horizontally, the double Art Deco design inspires a platinum ring paved with emeralds and diamonds that is simply enhanced by a fine line of green lacquer.


The piece may be worn in two ways: with or without its diamond surround. Thus, the piece becomes a solitaire which highlights a cushion-cut Zambian emerald of 6.25 carats.


As a complement, Boucheron proposes a pair of coordinating earrings which feature two detachable pear-cut emeralds of 4.04 and 3.99 carats. The remaining designs may be clipped onto the lobe or higher up along the cartilage of the ear.


Color Block

Lemon yellow, fuchsia pink, turquoise blue... This pop High Jewelry trio is truly in step with the times. For these three diamond-studded pieces of ear jewelry, the jeweler alludes to The Queen’s wardrobe with multicolored sapphires in vivid tones.


The scaled-down Art Deco design and the choice of pure colors create opportunities to wear the Color Blocks in unstructured ways. The Color Blocks may be worn alone or grouped in various ways on different parts of the ear.


Rolling Red

Borne by 34 uniquely paired Mozambique rubies and nearly 1,300 round and baguette diamonds, this set includes a necklace, a pair of earrings, and a ring that asserts ultra-contemporary elegance. On these models, the royal brooch design – stretched along a carpet of flamboyant gems – takes on a new dimension, revealing a totally modern approach.


The Boucheron style is present in the streamlined design of the necklace, featuring a central ornament that may be detached and transformed into a brooch. Meanwhile, a fully diamond-set choker emerges. Its links are structured and articulated like a snakeskin molting in the 21st century, leaving behind the flourishes of the past.


Lemon Slice

In a compact, monochrome version with white diamonds on white gold, the 1937 model metamorphoses into a sophisticated piece that may be worn as a barrette or brooch. Thanks to leather ribbons – available in six colors including fluorescent yellow –, the diamond design may also be clipped in various ways to be worn as a choker or bracelet. The contrast among materials is a way to update the High Jewelry genre, propelling it into the 21st century.


Moon White

Combining daintiness and strength, this transformable jewelry set juxtaposes the soft iridescence of Akoya pearls with the intense sparkle of diamonds. Featuring 175 Akoya pearls and diamond-set links, the three-strand necklace features a detachable Art Deco clasp paved with diamonds. This may become a hair ornament or a pair of brooches that brings inimitable elegance to a tuxedo lapel or turtleneck.


Following the same principle, Claire Choisne created a pair of earrings, each featuring a lower section adorned with an Akoya pearl that may be removed in order to wear the principal portion of the piece on a different part of the ear.


The Queen’s double clip brooch also inspired a pair of index rings with a contemporary design. Streamlined to the extreme, shaped in white gold paved with mother-of-pearl and diamonds, the Art Deco design leaves an impression in the mind’s eye like a sparkling print in eternal snow.


Mega Pink

These two brooches may be worn in various ways, together or separately. Either way, Mega Pink stands out for its bright pink tourmalines. Cut into cabochons and baguettes, the colored stones are highlighted by channel-set diamonds while pink lacquer areas heighten their intensity. This pair of brooches is suitable for men and women.







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